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Politics, Business & Culture in the Americas
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Economics & Finance

A new study released by the University of North Carolina and the Mexican National Public Health Institute (INSP) suggests that a 2013 tax is causing families to buy fewer sugary drinks. That's good news for health advocates, bad news for soda companies.

Brazil is up for sale, and bargain-hunters from Sam Zell to Stephen Schwarzman are looking for deals.

On Wednesday, Brazil’s Chamber of Deputies passed its second austerity bill in a week, just hours before approving an amendment that changed the bill’s direction and increased federal spending for retirees. If passed by the Senate, the amended bill faces a possible presidential veto and represents a roadblock to the government’s strategy for increasing revenues.

A proposed government austerity package may keep Brazil from a credit rating downgrade, but could cost President Dilma Rousseff some of her biggest supporters: the country’s labor unions.

Falling commodity prices dim the region's outlook. 2015 may be the fifth straight year of weak growth.
Book Reviews: Caribbean Renewal: Tackling Fiscal and Debt Challenges, by Charles Amo-Yartey and Therese Turner-Jones;<br> The Eastern Caribbean Economic and Currency Union: Macroeconomics and Financial Systems, by Alfred Schipke, Aliona Cebotari and Nita Thacker
Why digital currency can be a game-changer for Latin America.

Brazil’s economy is expected to contract by 0.83 percent this year and inflation to climb to 8.12 percent, according to the Brazilian Central Bank’s weekly survey of financial experts, which was released yesterday.

This week’s likely top stories: U.S.-Cuba talks promising; New delegation for FARC peace talks; Dollar strengthens against Latin American currencies; Tabaré Vázquez takes office; Peruvian businesses to learn from Costa Rican ecotourism.

“Barbarie” es la palabra que se repite en los artículos publicados sobre Venezuela en lo que va del año. Sin estar en una situación de conflicto bélico, el país de más de 2 mil kilómetros de costa Caribe, reservas energéticas y 30 millones de hectáreas cultivables funciona bajo una lógica barbárica donde el más fuerte gana un kilo de pollo, y el más armado vive, por lo menos hasta mañana.

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