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Energy & Commodities
Mexico's Enrique Peña Nieto is trying to push forward a controversial reform that will allow private-public partnerships for the first time in decades.

Recent discussions when in Caracas and Maracaibo have made clear that as soon as the late Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez died, the strategy of Petróleos de Venezuela S.A. (PDVSA) became “pragmatism” in the face of “necessity.”

The first nine months of Peña’s administration have kept the press busy and all of the country’s eyes and ears focused on what will happen next. He’s been characterized as bold, action-oriented and dynamic but clearly, not a team player.

New efforts by Venezuela’s national oil firm, PDVSA, to raise its lagging production. Is this really a change in strategy?

Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto revealed a set of reforms to the country’s energy sector on Monday which would open Mexico's energy sector to foreign investors and allow private firms to access profit-sharing contracts with state-run oil monopoly Pemex.

The conditions for renewable energy in Latin America are favorable. From the photovoltaic potential of the Atacama Desert in Chile to the many rivers that feed into hydroelectric dams in Brazil to the fields of African palm oil in Colombia, developers have been drawn to the region due to a unique geography that offers great potential for renewable feedstocks.

Arguments to watch out for.

Even in the face of a tough political climate and the geological difficulty of shale extraction in Argentina, investors are lining up.

The last barrier to an integrated electricity grid in the region.

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