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Innovation & Technology
The informal sector and social marginality are expanding in Latin America.

Despite Mexico City's list of regulations that includes new permit fees and a 1.5 percent tax on revenue, it appears that Uber has come out ahead–for now.

Cuba still lags far behind its Latin American counterparts on internet access, despite this week’s announcement that the government will provide Wi-Fi access to 35 state-run computer centers. Since the country’s first, humble 64kbit/s connection was established in 1996, not much has changed. Only 3.4 percent of Cuban households are connected, and a mere five percent of the population has occasional access to the Web, thanks largely to state agencies, foreign embassies and black market deals. As a result, it’s no surprise that the country continues to rank as having one of the world’s most repressive climates for information and communication technologies.

This week’s likely news stories: Guatemalan protestors call for the president’s resignation; Costa Rican vice president announces LGBT anti-discrimination decree; Chinese premier tours South America on investment venture; Guyana opposition party triumphs in presidential election; Honduran government brings Bitcoin technology to land registry.

The transformative power of digital finance.
Facebook's Javier Olivan on the future of social media in Latin America.
The cyber-revolution in health care.
Could newly rekindled U.S.-Cuba relations lead to more Internet access in Cuba?
What challenges does Latin America face in regulating telecommunications technology?
How the Internet Is turning Latin America's small businesses into global traders.

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