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unaccompanied minors
The scale of Central American youth migration to the U.S. is staggering. Understanding its causes will help policymakers respond more effectively.
Washington's broken immigration system was brought into sharp relief by the crisis at the U.S. border, but the political reaction doesn't help matters.

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) urged the United States yesterday to close detention centers for immigrant children and their families.

A Reuters/Ipsos poll released Monday revealed that 51 percent of Americans oppose President Barack Obama's plan to fast track deportations for unaccompanied Central American children apprehended at the U.S.-Mexico border.

If the members of Congress who pride themselves on being Christians are not listening to the American people (including their constituents, such as the 59 percent of Tea Party Republicans who favor a path to citizenship), their faith leaders, or even their own holy book, who exactly are they listening to?

Due to the high volume of unaccompanied minors coming from Central America, the Texas state government announced yesterday that it would relax the rules governing the required conditions in its shelters.

Multiple variables are contributing to the surge of migration from the Northern Triangle to the United States.

There were 600 fewer homicides in Honduras as compared to the same period last year, President Juan Orlando Hernández announced on Monday.

A much deeper and multi-faceted partnership and understanding between the U.S., Mexico and Central America is required to address the root causes of the migration crisis.

During the past few months, the United States, Mexico and Central American governments have brought attention to the number of unaccompanied minors fleeing towards the U.S. from Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Mexico.

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