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Chile
Latin America's students are angry—and getting angrier.

With the second round of the World Cup soccer tournament concluded the main storylines have been the success of teams from the Americas, the early exit of previous stalwarts England, Italy and Spain, the relatively high number of goals, and—at least in the United States—the sudden realization that soccer actually has a strong and passionate following. With two weeks to go, some commentators are already wondering aloud whether this will be the most successful World Cup of all time.

Chilean Minister of Health Helia Molina set out on Thursday to clarify the government’s position on legalizing therapeutic abortion—abortion only in cases of rape, putting the life of the mother at risk, and the inability of the fetus to live outside of the womb.

Regardless of where we go from here, this has been America's Cup.

President Bachelet’s administration faces an uphill battle with regards to Chile’s energy agenda. The HidroAysén project would have provided a major boost in addressing the country’s energy supply and costs.

After a three hour meeting on Tuesday, a committee of five ministers in Michelle Bachelet’s cabinet has rejected the HidroAysén project–a hydroelectric plan to build five dams in two rivers in Patagonia that would have generated 2,750-megawatts of energy and increased power generation in Chile by 10 percent.

What have been the benefits of countries adopting consulta previa?

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