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Politics, Business & Culture In Our Hemisphere
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Caribbean

On Monday, LGBT rights organizations kicked off PRiDE JA 2015, Jamaica’s first ever gay pride week. For a country that TIME magazine once called “the most homophobic place on earth,”  the event is testament  to a slowly improving climate for an often persecuted LGBT community.

Book Reviews: Caribbean Renewal: Tackling Fiscal and Debt Challenges, by Charles Amo-Yartey and Therese Turner-Jones;<br> The Eastern Caribbean Economic and Currency Union: Macroeconomics and Financial Systems, by Alfred Schipke, Aliona Cebotari and Nita Thacker

The Caribbean is addicted to cheap oil—but this is not sustainable, given the declining state of the Venezuelan economy. 

Energy dependence and vulnerability are serious issues in the Caribbean, where residents suffer from high and fluctuating electricity costs, frequent blackouts and poor service. Electricity prices are some of the highest in the world, averaging US$0.33 per kilowatt hour compared to $0.09 per kilowatt hour in the United States. Oil reliance is stifling the Caribbean’s economy and the region must work towards diversifying its matrix if it wants to be competitive.

European governments were unlikely to be pleased to hear the call for reparations issued by Caribbean Community (CARICOM) heads of state last month. The Caribbean countries jointly released a statement calling for forward action on a plan to pursue reparations for “repairing the damage inflicted by slavery and racism.”

Trinidad and Tobago, known more for Carnival and sandy beaches, is not often discussed in terms of its strategic importance to the United States.

Today is the 101st observation of International Women’s Day, a time to shine the global spotlight on the economic, political and social achievements of women

Listen to a series of interviews with stakeholders in three countries of the CARICOM economic zone: Guyana, Jamaica and St. Kitts & Nevis.

When it comes to having females in national leadership roles, Caribbean countries lag far behind.

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