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Education
Visa applications requiring extensive social media and biographical information are a hurdle to scientific collaboration, with vast consequences.

Today, I'm upset because there are many DREAMers who have the grades and the potential to go to the college of their dreams, but who just can’t go because they can’t afford it.

The Guatemalan private sector is targeting malnutrition and education to improve social inclusion.

Mexico’s Coordinadora Nacional de Trabajadores de la Educación (National Coordinator of Education Workers–CNTE), the powerful teacher’s union, took to the streets of Mexico City yesterday to protest President Enrique Peña Nieto’s educational reform, including a 3.5 percent increase in teachers’ wages.

The penal system does not work; criminals that do jail time do not reform. We’ve heard these arguments in Mexico before—and for the most part, they seem to be true.

The first nine months of Peña’s administration have kept the press busy and all of the country’s eyes and ears focused on what will happen next. He’s been characterized as bold, action-oriented and dynamic but clearly, not a team player.

Attention is focused on the public demonstrations in Brazil, but for the last month, protests over the underfunding of public education have raged across Venezuela.

Top stories this week are likely to include: Fidel Castro’s birthday; Buenos Aires subway shutdown continues; public teachers to end striking in Panama; talks to renew in Colombia between the government and the Indigenous Nasa; and a possible dialogue over Venezuela’s detained U.S. Marine.

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