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Environment & Sustainability

Peruvian Minister of the Environment Manuel Pulgar-Vidal, who is presiding over this year’s United Nations summit on climate change in Lima, said on Tuesday that building a national carbon inventory will be his country’s first step for reducing emissions and formulating an “intended nationally determined contribution” (INDC), which countries will submit March 2015.

Christiana Figueres, secretary general of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, said that global emissions should peak in the next few years.

If Colombia’s EITI candidacy is successful, it would become only the second country in South America—and the fourth in Latin America—to join the initiative.

The unclear legacy of Chico Mendes in Brazil reflects a larger indifference toward the environment and underscores the improbable rise of his protégé, Marina Silva.

This week’s likely top stories: Canadian businessman Cy Tokmakjian is sentenced to 15 years in Cuba; Mexico searches for 58 missing students; Venezuela’s bolivar hits a new low; Peru arrests two suspects in the murder of Indigenous activists; Colombian peace negotiator Humberto de la Calle says his e-mail was hacked.

The question of how global infrastructure projects can best promote green and inclusive growth while reducing enivronmental damage is particularly important to Mesoamerica.

View a series of photos from the People's Climate March on September 21, which brought more than 300,000 protesters to the streets of New York City.

Brazilian Environment Minister Izabella Teixeira stated yesterday that Brazil will not sign a global anti-deforestation initiative that will be announced at the United Nations Climate Summit today.

From the age of 10, Marina Silva would wake up before dawn to prepare food for her father, so that he could set off through the dense jungle before the heat of the tropical sun made it impossible for him to keep working. In Silva’s community of rubber tappers in Brazil’s northwestern state of Acre, survival depended on the collection of natural latex that bleeds like sap from the Amazon’s seringueira tree.

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