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Panama

This week’s likely top stories: Brazilians demonstrate against corruption; Colombian generals investigated;  Obama and Castro hold meeting; Puerto Rico seeks debt help; Chilean communities fight mining companies over water.

As the leaders of almost every nation in the Americas arrive in Panama, this opening act has set the stage for the rest of the summit—appropriately centered on the “challenge of cooperation in the Americas.” One can only hope the long-awaited U.S.-Cuba thaw will set the example for Cuba’s own internal reconciliation.

 

Clashes between Cuban and Venezuelan dissidents and pro-government supporters marked the initial proceedings of the Summit of the Americas in Panama City on Wednesday, two days before the summit officially begins.

There could be very important diplomatic exchanges behind the scenes at the Summit of the Americas, which could prove pivotal for the world’s response to global climate change.

This week’s likely top stories: The Summit of the Americas commences in Panama; petition criticizes U.S. action against Venezuela; Argentine Central Bank inspects Citibank; TSJ initiates missiles trial in Bolivia; Canada and Venezuela discuss investment in Venezuelan oil.

Failure to comply with ILO Convention 169 has caused recurring friction between the government and Indigenous communities in Panama and throughout the entire region.

This week’s likely top stories: Peru’s allegations against Chile threaten relations; Panama to address conflict over Barro Blanco; Guatemala and Honduras to eliminate customs duties; São Paulo grapples with drought; Caracas Mayor to appeal conspiracy charges.

The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) approved $100 million dollars for Costa Rica to modernize its border-crossing infrastructure, the Ministry of Finance announced on Tuesday.

Panama’s Supreme Court voted unanimously on Wednesday to appoint a special prosecutor to investigate corruption claims against former president Ricardo Martinelli.

Only two countries in Latin America—Costa Rica and Uruguay—can be considered “full democracies,” according to an Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) study commissioned by BBC for Democracy Day on January 20.

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