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Guatemala
Guatemalans returning home from the U.S. face unemployment, a maze of red tape—and social stigma. <i>(slideshow available)</i>
The Guatemalan state has failed in its obligations to consult Indigenous peoples.

On Tuesday former Guatemalan President Alfonso Portillo plead guilty to a money-laundering case in New York City federal court and will be sentenced to four to six years in federal prison on June 23.

The likelihood is that Guatemala’s next attorney general will be a less dynamic, less controversial pick than the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize candidate and Forbes nominee of one of six women changing the world, Claudia Paz y Paz.

Likely top stories this week: the International Court of Justice will rule on the Chile-Peru Maritime border; the CELAC Summit begins on Tuesday in Havana, Cuba; Argentina begins easing restrictions on purchasing US dollars; protesters of the World Cup clash with police in Sao Paulo; Belize and Guatemala sign an agreement at the OAS.

Last week, Guatemala’s Court of High Risk “B” (Tribunal de Mayor Riesgo “B”) announced that the genocide trial of Guatemala’s former president, General Efraín Ríos Montt,  will not resume until January 2015.

When masked men burst into the tiny hamlet of San José Nacahuil on a peaceful Sunday evening last month, what followed was all too familiar to Guatemalans.

Fourteen suspects were captured in recent weeks for their role in the June 13 massacre of an entire police station in Salcajá, Guatemala, a case that has shocked a country with a high threshold for violent acts.

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