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Abortion
Several factors help explain why the two don't necessarily go hand-in-hand.

In a report released on Thursday, Amnesty International stated that El Salvador’s total ban on abortion is killing women and infringing upon human rights progress.

More women in political power hasn't necessarily translated into more protection for women's rights.

Chilean Minister of Health Helia Molina set out on Thursday to clarify the government’s position on legalizing therapeutic abortion—abortion only in cases of rape, putting the life of the mother at risk, and the inability of the fetus to live outside of the womb.

Despite the group’s efforts, Texas political analysts have been quick to note that Battleground Texas is unlikely to have any major impact within the foreseeable future.

Former President Michelle Bachelet, the Nueva Mayoría pact’s candidate for Chile’s November presidential election, expressed her support on Monday for legalizing abortion in cases of medical emergency and rape.

Top stories this week: Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff responds to national protests; U.S. Senate votes on immigration reform; Colombian coca farmers clash with police; Uruguay upholds abortion; Judicial leaders meet in Bolivia; Ecuador considers asylum request.

Doctors in Brazil sparked debate yesterday when the Conselho Federal de Medicina (Federal Council of Medicine) published a petition endorsing the legalization of first-trimester abortions.

A bill to legalize abortion in Uruguay, having passed the Senate in December 2011, remains stalled in the Chamber of Deputies.

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