btn_subscribe-top
btn_give-a-gift
btn_login
btn_signup
btn_rss

Blog

  • New Americas Quarterly to be Released: Tech in Latin America

    Monday, April 20, 2015

    New Americas Quarterly to be Released: Technology in Latin America

    How will technological change affect governance, social inclusion, economic development, and civil society? The Spring 2015 issue of Americas Quarterly, to be released on May 7, explores how the Internet and other tech innovations have transformed the Americas. Does greater connectivity translate into improved governance, social inclusion, economic development, and democratization? Is the hemisphere keeping up with the cyberworld?

    In this issue, James Bosworth explains why politicians and regulators need to start preparing now for the technological shifts coming their way—from driverless cars in our streets to drones in our skies. Facebook's Javier Olivan predicts where social media is going in the region, and Diego Molano Vega describes how Colombia is reducing poverty through information and communications technology. Meanwhile, Ellery Biddle asks whether improved U.S.Cuba relations will lead to better Internet access for Cuban citizens, Aaron Oliker shares how 3D printing is revolutionizing health care, and Erik Stettler explains how to turn Latin American cities into innovation hubs. Plus, our AQ Charticle looks at the best new apps across the hemisphere.

    Also in the issue, Alejandro Tarre reports on the other side of Cuba's overseas medical missions, Robert Maguire takes an in-depth look at Haiti under President Michel Martelly, and Alejandro Werner analyzes the effect of falling commodity prices on the region's growth outlook.

    Read the table of contents below. Check out the AQ app and subscribe now to take advantage of our special discount.


  • Havana Film Festival New York 2015 Premiere

    Thursday, April 9, 2015

    This week, the Havana Film Festival New York (HFFNY) will celebrate its sixteenth year, featuring over 45 films from across the Americas. From April 9 to 17, venues across New York City will showcase panels, discussions with directors and producers, and films from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, Nicaragua, Puerto Rico, Uruguay, the U.S., and Venezuela.

    Read More

  • New Americas Quarterly Released: The Decline of U.S. Power?

    Wednesday, February 4, 2015

    New Americas Quarterly Released: The Decline of U.S. Power?

    Is the era of U.S. hemispheric hegemony over? The Winter 2015 issue of Americas Quarterly, released on February 4, explores how inter-state dynamics have changed in the region, and how this has affected Latin American foreign policy. How are governments and multilateral organizations responding to the real or perceived decline in U.S. influence in the region?  Will the greater independence of governments to pursue their own diplomatic paths produce more regional harmony?

    In this issue, Daniel W. Drezner asks whether waning U.S. presence will truly benefit the region, while Harold Trinkunas explores Brazil’s rising global ambitions and Rafael Fernández de Castro discusses Mexico’s evolving foreign policy in Central America. Meanwhile, Guy Edwards and Timmons Roberts look at Latin America’s fragmented approach to confronting global climate change, Víctor M. Mijares reviews Venezuela’s post-Chávez foreign policy and the impact of declining oil prices on the country’s economy, and Diana Negroponte examines Russian arms sales in Latin America and provides an overview of the country’s growing role in the region. Plus, our AQ Charticle looks at border conflicts across the hemisphere.

    In a special “Ask the Experts” forum, AQ asks regional experts Pia Riggirozzi, Andrew F. Cooper, Rodrigo Páez Montalbán, Jessica Byron, and Oliver Stuenkel to weigh in on the future of the Organization of American States and discuss how it can remain relevant in a changing hemisphere. Also in this issue, journalist Glenn Cheney reports on the life-and-death struggle of Indigenous Tenharim to preserve their land, Antonia Stolper discusses what’s next as Argentina faces off against holdout creditors in U.S. courts, and Jorge Kawas takes an in-depth look at the effectiveness of mano dura policies in Latin America’s penal and judicial systems.

    Read the table of contents and check out the AQ app. Subscribe now to take advantage of our special limited-time discount.


  • Cuba, What's Next: It's All About the Regs

    Monday, January 5, 2015

    Now that the U.S. has restored diplomatic relations with Cuba and plans to expand travel, financial transactions and commerce on the island, it's up to the Commerce and Treasury departments to determine how to regulate the new changes. Americas Quarterly Editor-in-Chief Christopher Sabatini explains why the regulations will matter to the U.S. private sector, Cuban entrepreneurs and human rights advocates in his January 2 editorial for the Huffington Post.

    Cuba, What's Next: It's All About the Regs

    Read More

  • Cuba Change We Can Believe In

    Thursday, December 18, 2014

    This is change we can believe in. The comprehensive diplomatic and economic reforms announced on Wednesday, December 17, by President Barack Obama will have a greater impact on the Cuban people, and our policy goals in the small island nation, than the policies we've tried over the last five decades, says Americas Quarterly senior editor and AS/COA director of policy Alana Tummino. Read her December 18 editorial for U.S. News & World Report below.

    Cuba Change We Can Believe In

    It’s what you don’t expect to wake up to on a mild December morning: Alan Gross has boarded a plane home from Havana, and President Barack Obama is slated to give remarks that would finally restore normalized relations with Cuba.

    Change you can believe in? I’ll say amen to that.

    The release of Gross, a U.S. Agency for International Development contractor (on the first day of Hanukkah, no less), is a long-awaited and welcome return, signaling one of the more important shifts in U.S. and Cuba policy in more than 50 years.

    If Obama had only announced the release of Gross, that would have been enough. But he went further.


  • Let's Stick it to Cuba (and Make the Next Summit of the Americas Interesting)

    Tuesday, December 16, 2014

    If Latin American heads of state want to shame the United States into changing its Cuba policy, then Washington should insist that its allies and the summit’s host, Panama, also invite Cuban dissidents and human rights activists, says Americas Quarterly Editor-in-Chief and AS/COA Senior Director of Policy Christopher Sabatini. Read his December 16 article in Foreign Policy below.

    Let's Stick it to Cuba (and Make the Next Summit of the Americas Interesting)

    Four months before the next Summit of the Americas takes place in Panama, talk of who will be invited has already overshadowed the agenda of the biannual event. Part of this is because, quite frankly, the official agenda has never made much news in the summit’s 20-year history. But the current debate over the invite list has served to bring a long-overdue focus on the most controversial country in the region: Cuba.

    At the last summit, in 2012 in Cartagena, Colombia, all the Latin American and Caribbean heads of state voted to invite Cuba to the next gathering. The vote, which was opposed by both the United States and Canada, was clearly intended to embarrass Washington and force a change in its 53-year-old failed policy of imposing an economic embargo on Cuba in an effort to improve the human rights situation there.

    But far from providing yet another opportunity for the rest of the region to embarrass the gringos, the April summit, where 83-year-old Raúl Castro will join 34 elected heads of state, may finally make the 20-year-old gathering interesting. In fact, it might even make the summit useful. If played correctly, the United States can both leverage this moment for its own legitimate concerns for democracy in Cuba and support its allies in the region.

    If Latin American heads of state want to shame the United States into changing its Cuba policy, then Washington should insist that its allies and the summit’s host, Panama, also invite Cuban dissidents and human rights activists.


  • Venezuela Squandered Oil Riches, Now Faces Default

    Monday, December 15, 2014

    As global oil prices fall, the Venezuelan government must decide between devaluing the country's currency, cutting costs—including the state’s generous gasoline subsidy, or relying on Chinese support to keep the country's economy afloat, says Americas Quarterly Editor-in-Chief and AS/COA Senior Director of Policy Christopher Sabatini. Read his December 14 editorial in CNN Money below.

    Venezuela squandered oil riches, now faces default

    Read More

  • AQ’s Christopher Sabatini interviewed on CNN International

    Tuesday, December 2, 2014

    View an interview with AQ’s Christopher Sabatini below.

    Christopher Sabatini, senior director of policy at Americas Society/Council of the Americas and founder and editor-in-chief of Americas Quarterly, was interviewed on CNN International this Tuesday about the effect of cheap global oil prices on Venezuela’s already fragile economy.

    The interview, moderated by CNN reporter Maggie Lake, focused on the further deteriorating economic situation in Venezuela as a result the downturn in oil prices following OPEC’s decision last week not to alter its production ceiling as well as possible implications for state policy and President Nicolas Maduro’s political future.  

    Read More

  • New Americas Quarterly Released: Cuba and Colombia

    Wednesday, November 5, 2014

    New Americas Quarterly Released: Cuba and Colombia

    What does the future hold for Cuba and Colombia? The Fall 2014 issue of Americas Quarterly, released on November 5, explores the promising but difficult roads ahead for two Latin American countries potentially on the verge of historic change. Will the Colombian government’s progress in forging a negotiated peace with the Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia—FARC) bring a just and sustainable end to the country’s deadly 50-year-old armed conflict? What major challenges must Cuba overcome to jump-start its economy and improve life on the island—and how can the U.S. facilitate this process?

    In this issue, Juanita León examines the legal and political obstacles that Colombia faces in its quest to secure a lasting peace, Marcela Prieto dispels common misperceptions about the peace process, and Rodrigo Uprimny and Nelson Camilo Sánchez discuss how to best achieve justice for victims of the decades-long violence. Meanwhile, journalists Jenny Manrique and Ramón Campos Iriarte interview the FARC’s delegates in Havana and ELN guerrillas in Chocó, and Alejandro Eder explains how disarmed ex-combatants are being re-integrated into Colombian society.

    In our section on Cuba, Carmelo Mesa-Lago describes the political resistance and red tape that must be resolved to ensure that Cuba’s recent economic reforms are successful. Robert Muse lays out a roadmap for improving U.S.-Cuba relations, and Richard Feinberg argues that the U.S. must rethink its policy toward the island well before next year’s Summit of the Americas in Panama. AS/COA CEO and President Susan Segal finds inspiration and promise in the island’s pioneering entrepreneurs, and Alana Tummino and Allie Fleder take a trip across the island to meet with Cuban cuentapropistas to document their successes and struggles.

    AQ also looks at the surge of unaccompanied minors at the U.S.-Mexico border, as Sam Quinones urges politicians in Washington to take quick action to resolve the humanitarian crisis. Eduardo Guerrero and Alejandro Hope debate the merits of Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto’s security policy, and Daniel H. Levine asks whether Latin America’s first pope, Francis I, will change the future of Catholicism in the region.

    Read the table of contents and check out the AQ app. Subscribe now to take advantage of our special limited-time discount


  • AQ's Christopher Sabatini Interviewed about Sustainable Cities

    Thursday, October 30, 2014

    View an interview with AQ’s Christopher Sabatini below

    Christopher Sabatini, Senior Director of Policy at Americas Society/Council of the Americas and founder and editor-in-chief of Americas Quarterly, was interviewed by the International Development Bank as part of the its Emerging and Sustainable Cities Initiative. Following the launch of AQ’s Winter 2014 issue, Our Cities, Our Future, Sabatini comments on the challenges and opportunities that cities face in the 21st century to become more inclusive and sustainable.  

    What are the main challenges that cities are facing today?

    Read More

Pages


 
 

Connect with AQ


Twitter YouTube Itunes App Store

 

Most Popular

MOST POPULAR ON AQ ONLINE

  • Most Viewed
  • Past:
  • 1 day
  • 1 week
  • 1 month
  • 1 year

WEB EXCLUSIVES

NOW ON AS/COA ONLINE

Loading...

AQ MEDIA PARTNER

Loading...