Stephen Harper

This week’s likely news stories: Mexico’s ruling party wins the congressional elections; Canada and Japan block a G7 statement on carbon emissions; Latin American officials to discuss Mercosur at EU-CELAC Summit; Argentina’s debt inflates after U.S. court ruling; protestors demand Honduran president’s resignation.

Both Stephen Harper and Hillary Clinton are aware that generational politics can trump the experience card.  But they are also conscious that experienced leaders like Angela Merkel and Benjamin Netanyahu have also recently won elections largely propelled by their track record. 

Canadians deserve better than election-year partisan battles over a resolution where there is no identified endgame and a significant information deficit about the dangers. 

On Tuesday, the Harper Conservative government decided with its majority in the Canadian House of Commons to engage Canada in the U.S.-led mission against ISIS.

President Obama has requested Canada’s participation in the developing coalition against terrorism in Syria and Iraq. What will be the role of Canada?

While thousands of federal workers in the U.S. went back to work today after grappling with the government shutdown and debt ceiling crisis, Canada’s Parliament has just now reopened for business, with Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s second Throne Speech since his party won a majority government mandate in May 2011.

On Wednesday, during a one day visit to Peru, Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced a new aid package aimed in part at helping regional governments more effectively reinvest taxes and royalties from mining in programs to alleviate poverty. 

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