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Daniel Ortega

The National Assembly of Nicaragua met last Wednesday to discuss a proposal from the ruling Frente Sandinista de Liberación Nacional party (Sandinista National Liberation Front—FSLN), which seeks to remove a constitutional article banning consecutive presidential terms.

Nicaraguans are demanding transparency about the future of this canal and want to be involved in the discussion. Real progress involves every sector of Nicaraguan society, not just Managua elite.

The use of state-run media outlets has skyrocketed in Venezuela, Ecuador and Nicaragua. What are the implications for freedom of the press?
The newly elected leaders of Guatemala and Nicaragua are familiar. So are the problems they face.

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad arrived in Venezuela yesterday afternoon to kick off his four-country tour of Latin America that will also include stops in Nicaragua, Cuba and Ecuador.

Daniel Ortega's re-election as president is not being recognized by his challenger, Fabio Gadea. What happens next?

Guatemala and Nicaragua went to the polls yesterday to (re)elect their presidents; Otto Pérez Molina was declared the victor in Guatemala, while Nicaragua is still tabulating its votes.

Electoral campaigns for Sunday’s presidential and legislative elections closed on Wednesday night, with polls predicting that incumbent president Daniel Ortega will win another term.

Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega is the frontrunner candidate in a nationwide presidential campaign that officially began on Saturday in Managua.

Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega proposed a referendum on Tuesday that would demand that the U.S. government pay $17 billion in damages to Nicaragua for its role in that country’s civil war in the 1980s.

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