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Comprehensive Immigration Reform

Last November, President Barack Obama announced a historic executive action that could allow up to 4.4 million undocumented immigrants to gain relief from deportation and apply for employment authorization documents.

The president has an opportunity to reward and incentivize immigrant entrepreneurship. By protecting millions of immigrant consumers, he would also give a boost to local businesses by supporting the buying power of the immigrant community.

This week's likely top stories: Colombia’s peace talks suspended over kidnapping; U.S. will grant refugee status to select minors from Central America; Brazilian police arrest 27 in Petrobras corruption scandal; Cruise ship tourism is booming in Cuba; Pemex invests millions in hydrocarbon production and exploration.

Today, U.S. officials said that President Barack Obama is planning to announce a broad overhaul of the national immigration enforcement system to protect up to 5 million undocumented immigrants from deportation.

Washington's broken immigration system was brought into sharp relief by the crisis at the U.S. border, but the political reaction doesn't help matters.

Despite the divisive rhetoric in Washington that has politicized and paralyzed any chance for reform on immigration, we’ve seen the pendulum shift from local-level ordinances that made life more difficult for immigrants to more and more cities working to create an environment that supports immigrant inclusion.

This week’s likely top stories: Barack Obama delays executive action on immigration; a former Petrobras director names 40 politicians in scandal; former Salvadoran President Flores turns himself in; private equity fundraising in Latin America this year could reach $8 billion; Chileans remember September 11, 1973.

If the members of Congress who pride themselves on being Christians are not listening to the American people (including their constituents, such as the 59 percent of Tea Party Republicans who favor a path to citizenship), their faith leaders, or even their own holy book, who exactly are they listening to?

Seventy-one percent of likely voters—including 64 percent of Republicans—in the most competitive congressional districts in the United States consider support for comprehensive immigration reform an important factor in how they cast their vote in November, a recent Politico poll found.

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