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Human Rights

With the conclusion on Tuesday of the first formal talks between Cuba and the United States on human rights, both countries agreed that they were capable of holding a “respectful, professional [and] civilized conversation” on the issue of human rights.

This week’s likely top stories: Bolivia holds local elections; Cuba and the U.S. to discuss human rights; Caribbean Bitcoin exchange launches; UNASUR head urges closing of U.S. military bases in the region; Chile rejects Bolivian aid for flood victims.

As an emerging global power and an established leader in Latin America, Brazil is better positioned than any other country to either provide shelter or silently watch the demise of the oldest human rights organ of the continent.

Masked men reportedly broke into Venezuelan opposition leader Leopoldo López’ jail cell, in alleged retaliation for a meeting between U.S. Vice President Biden and López' wife.

Despite Arredondo’s conviction for the 1980 burning of the Spanish Embassy in Guatemala City, the masterminds of the crime—and other acts of state terrorism in Guatemala at the time—remain untouchable. 

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and Human Rights Watch (HRW) on Monday asked the U.S. Justice Department to designate a special prosecutor to examine the CIA’s use of torture as well as other illegal measures when questioning terrorism suspects.

Brazil’s Comissão Nacional de Verdade (National Truth Comission—CNV) delivered its official report yesterday on human rights violations committed in Brazil between 1946 and 1988.

The U.S. Senate approved a bill on Monday that would impose sanctions on Venezuelan officials found responsible for violating demonstrators’ rights during anti-government protests that left more than 40 dead and 800 injured since February.

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