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Juan Francisco Sáenz-Tamez, the 23-year-old head of Mexico’s Gulf Cartel, has made his first court appearance.

As the U.S. nears its mid-term elections, primetime U.S. media events—the recent debate on the war against ISIS, global terrorism, the international Ebola scare, and the pending approval of the Keystone Pipeline—are making top news fodder in Canada as well.

The United States Supreme Court yesterday refused to review a series of appeals court decisions that overturned same-sex marriage bans in five states.

This week’s likely top stories: Dilma Rousseff and Aécio Neves head to a runoff election; U.S. Supreme Court rejects same-sex marriage appeals; domestic renewable energy market opens in Chile; Mexican college students may be buried in mass graves; Peruvian elections are marred by violence; Catamarca creates a new mining district.

Despite the divisive rhetoric in Washington that has politicized and paralyzed any chance for reform on immigration, we’ve seen the pendulum shift from local-level ordinances that made life more difficult for immigrants to more and more cities working to create an environment that supports immigrant inclusion.

President Obama has requested Canada’s participation in the developing coalition against terrorism in Syria and Iraq. What will be the role of Canada?

View a series of photos from the People's Climate March on September 21, which brought more than 300,000 protesters to the streets of New York City.

This week’s likely top stories: World leaders gather for the UN General Assembly; Leopoldo López’ trial resumes in Venezuela; U.S. to approve aid to El Salvador; 8 killed in Guatemala conflict over cement plant; Clorox discontinues operations in Venezuela.

This week’s likely top stories: Venezuela is expected to win a seat on the UN Security Council; Brazilian President Rousseff and Marina Silva are tied in a new poll; U.S. deportations are at their lowest level since 2007; Santander’s new chairwoman will maintain the bank's current strategy; Ecuadorian President Correa asks supporters to mobilize against anticipated protests.

This week’s likely top stories: Barack Obama delays executive action on immigration; a former Petrobras director names 40 politicians in scandal; former Salvadoran President Flores turns himself in; private equity fundraising in Latin America this year could reach $8 billion; Chileans remember September 11, 1973.

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