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Piracy in Latin America

Latin America's tolerance for intellectual property theft not only leads to economic losses, it also finances organized crime. 

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Special Report

How to Stop Piracy – and Protect Latin America's Geniuses

Piracy and counterfeiting make life miserable for the region's creative workers. They deserve better. 

The Insidious Device Revolutionizing Piracy in Latin America

By JONATHAN FRANKLIN
A little black box spells mayhem for the entertainment industry. Smuggled from China, it makes stealing content as easy as flipping a switch. 

In Guatemala and Mexico, Two Very Different Responses to Piracy

By XIMENA ENRÍQUEZ
Sometimes governments act to stop piracy. Sometimes they don't. Here are two stories that show very different outcomes. 

How Latin American Governments Compare on Anti-Piracy

By EMILIE SWEIGART
A look at what the region's governments are doing - and not doing - to stem piracy.  

Ten Ways Piracy Is Everywhere in Latin America

By BEN MILLER
From books to medicine, piracy affects more than just entertainment.

How Colombia Is Protecting Indigenous and Afro-Descendant Knowledge

By RAQUEL CEBALLOS MOLANO
How Colombia fought to protect indigenous knowledge. 

Victimless Act? How Organized Crime Profits from Pirated Goods

By EDSON LUIZ VISMONA
For a safer Latin America, we should stop romanticizing piracy. 

Who Really Buys Pirated Goods in Latin America?

AQ's correspondents hit pirate-filled markets in five Latin American cities to ask consumers whether they buy knock-offs. 

AQ Top 5: The Inventors

AQ profiles five Latin Americans who have come up with solutions to problems from air pollution to safety risks for Brazil's black filmmakers. 

SPONSORED CONTENT
The True Costs of Illicit Tobacco

Illicit tobacco costs Latin America and Canada $4.6 billion every year.

Features

The Western Hemisphere Needs U.S. Leadership

By JOE BIDEN
The case for greater engagement between Latin America and the U.S.

A New Year for Brazil and Mexico

Jair Bolsonaro's Guru

By BRIAN WINTER
Olavo de Carvalho might be the most important voice in Brazil's incoming government. And he doesn't even live there. 

Marielle Lives

By MANUELA ANDREONI
After Marielle Franco's assassination, new voices sprung up in the black community. Renata Souza says entering politics was the right answer.

How Bolsonaro Will Govern

By BRENDAN O'BOYLE
The supporters, the opposition and the priorities.

Becoming AMLO

By BENJAMIN RUSSELL
An interview with historian Lorenzo Meyer on the defining moments of López Obrador's career.

How AMLO Will Govern

By BENJAMIN RUSSELL
The supporters, the opposition and the priorities.

Cultura

Why Roma May Be the Best Film of 2018

By BEN MILLER
Alfonso Cuarón's latest release offers a sublime portrait of family life in 1970s Mexico. 

Music: AQ's Winter Playlist

By SEBASTIÁN ZUBIETA
Our list of warming winter sounds.

Books: The Road Ahead

By ROBERTO SIMON
A group of foreign policy planners offer their views of global diplomacy in The Road Ahead.

Books: Lost Children Archive

By ALEJANDRA OLIVA
A review of Valeria Luiselli's Lost Children Archive.

Departments

Long View: A Frozen Peace

By RYAN MUSTO
A Cold War treaty has kept peaceful collaboration alive.

Panorama: El Salvador's Election

By BRENDAN O'BOYLE
An interview with Carlos Dada, Salvadoran journalist, founder and director of El Faro.



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