2014 World Cup

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff said on Wednesday that the host nation’s trouble with World Cup preparations are normal. “Everywhere in the world these big engineering projects always go down to the wire,” she told reporters at the presidential palace.

This week’s likely top stories: the OAS General Assembly will take place in Asunción this week; Brazil creates  a “Crisis Cabinet” for the World Cup; Salvador Sánchez Cerén is sworn in in El Salvador; Leopoldo López faces a hearing in Venezuela; Uruguayans vote in primary elections.

This week’s likely top stories: U.S. Congress considers sanctions against Venezuela; Uruguay’s José Mujica visits with Barack Obama; the leader of the Zetas may be dead; Brazil faces new obstacles in World Cup preparations; Michelle Bachelet visits Cristina Fernández de Kirchner in Argentina.

Do megasports events contribute to economic development? No
Do megasports events contribute to economic development? Yes

Brazil’s policy toward its favelas has become increasingly militarized. 

Likely top stories this week: Self-defense forces take over in Apatzingan, Michoacán; currency controls threaten Venezuelan newspapers; stadium construction workers may go on strike in Manaus; Obama's pending decision on the Keystone Pipeline; nine people are killed in Petén, Guatemala.

The Fédération Internationale de Football Association (International Federation of Association Football—FIFA) warned officials in the Brazilian city of Curitiba on Tuesday that it could be excluded as a host site of the 2014 World Cup if preparations remain behind schedule.

President Dilma Rousseff said yesterday that Brazil will successfully host the 2014 FIFA World Cup, despite construction delays at numerous stadiums.

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