Cuban economy

This week's likely top stories: Global leaders gather in Lima for the COP20 Climate Summit; Tabaré Vázquez wins the runoff presidential election in Uruguay; With FARC hostages released, Colombian peace talks are set to resume in Havana; Venezuela braces for impact as oil prices hit rock bottom; Cuba misses the mark on economic growth in 2014.

Cuba's rising entrepreneurs face special challenges, but their energies and creativity are recognizable the world over.
Cuba's rising entrepreneurs face special challenges, but their energies and creativity are recognizable the world over.
The non-state sector has expanded, but the red tape and bottlenecks haven't changed.
The plan to unify Cuba's dual currencies will produce winners—and losers.

To develop their projects, private businesspeople who invest in Cuba are obliged to accept conditions that do not correspond broadly with those established by international law in most other parts of the world.

The government of Cuba announced yesterday that it will permanently close the island’s Ministry of Sugar as part of larger-scale reforms designed to modernize Cuba’s economy and increase efficiency.

Cuban President Raúl Castro acknowledged yesterday that the frenetic pace of public sector layoffs in recent months is unsustainable and will be scaled back to help brunt the impact of the cuts.



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