Cuba

Likely top stories this week: Solís wins Costa Rican election; the Obama Administration faces increasing pressure on its deportation policy; Venezuelan government reacts after Spain suspends the sale of riot gear; a FIFA executive admits that Brazil is still behind schedule for the 2014 World Cup.

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) covertly created “ZunZuneo”—a Cuban version of the online messaging network Twitter—to cause civil unrest in Cuba, the Associate Press reported on Thursday.

Likely top stories this week: the Cuban government passes a new foreign investment law; Venezuelan troops take control of San Cristóbal; Costa Rican presidential candidate Solís lacks an opponent; Brazilian security forces raid Maré favela in Rio; China's Chinalco halts its Toromocho mining project in Peru.

The Cuban Council of State called an extraordinary session of the National Assembly in order to debate and approve a new foreign investment law on Saturday, March 29, the state-run Granma newspaper announced Wednesday.

As tensions between the United States and Russia over the future of the Ukraine’s Crimean peninsula continue to rise, Moscow officials may look to beef up their country’s stronghold in Latin America.

The United States released the second member of a group of five Cuban prisoners—known as the “Cuban Five”—from an Arizona prison on Thursday.

In a recent interview with The Washington Post, Florida sugar magnate Alfonso Fanjul said he is ready to do business with Cuba “under the right circumstances.”  The questions are: “what are the right circumstances?" and “who benefits when American companies ‘do business’ with communist Cuba?”

The need to support ongoing economic reform in Cuba makes it more necessary now to talk to Cuba, rather than talk about Cuba.

Either because they don’t want to alienate part of their constituency at home or because belonging to the CELAC Club gives them economic or political benefits, Latin American and Caribbean leaders have been blackmailed to avoid criticizing systems that enable authoritarian leaders to concentrate power, crush dissent and persecute journalists.

With a series of statements by leading Cuban-Americans, stories of change inside the island, and growing public pressure and attention to liberalize the U.S. embargo toward Cuba, I’d wager that soon the Cuban government will do something to halt the process.

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