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Piracy
Piracy and counterfeiting make life miserable for the region's creative workers. They deserve better.
The "black box" transmits movies, TV and streaming services like Netflix at a fraction of the usual cost. It's highly popular — and completely illegal.
AQ sent reporters to five street markets around Latin America to ask why people buy pirated and counterfeit goods. Some of their answers surprised us.
A look at what the region's governments are doing - and not doing - to stem piracy.
Sometimes governments act to stop piracy. Sometimes they don't. Here are two stories that show very different outcomes.

The government of Ecuador released a statement on Thursday dismissing the headline of an earlier article by the Spanish international wire service EFE that Ecuador is on a United States “black list” of countries in violation of intellectual property rights.

Apple Inc. launched its iTunes digital multimedia store yesterday in 16 Latin American countries—a move that industry analysts believe will curb music piracy in the region.



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