Politics, Business & Culture in the Americas
Podcast

AQ Podcast: How China’s Presence In Latin America Is Changing

Felipe Larraín on how trade and investment flows changed in recent years.
Reading Time: < 1 minute

In the last two decades, China has been a fundamental part of Latin America’s economies. But the relationship is far from static. In today’s episode, we’ll look at how trade and investment flows changed in recent years and explore Beijing’s goals in the region. Our guest, Felipe Larraín, is a former two-time finance minister of Chile and a professor of economics at Universidad Católica de Chile. He evaluates recent trends and future trajectories for direct investment, official lending, trade and infrastructure; analyzes how the region’s countries should, in his opinion, position themselves in the China-U.S. dispute; and discusses what has surprised him the most about Sino-Latin America ties.

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Guests

Felipe Larraín B. is a former minister of finance of Chile (2010-14 and 2018-19), is professor of economics at Universidad Católica de Chile, a member of the United Nations Leadership Council for Sustainable Development and the Atlantic Council Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center’s Advisory Council.

Brian Winter is AQ’s editor-in-chief

Supplemental reading: 

China’s Evolving Presence in Latin America by Felipe Larraín B. and Pepe Zhang

How Latin America Can Navigate the China-US Trade Wars by Felipe Larraín B. and Pepe Zhang

AQ Podcast: Can China Save Latin America Again?

WEBCAST: Navigating the China-U.S. Divide: A Challenge for Latin America

Latin America Doesn’t Want a New Cold War by Juan Gabriel Tokatlian

Why Mexico’s Relationship with China Is So Complicated by Martha Bárcena

AQ Podcast: What Does 2023 Hold for Latin American Economies?


Tags: AQ Podcast, China, China and Latin America, Economy, Latin America
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Any opinions expressed in this piece do not necessarily reflect those of Americas Quarterly or its publishers.
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