Pemex
Mexico has the resources it needs to revitalize its oil industry. But the president first needs a policy rethink.
A viable plan to rescue Pemex exists, but the president has chosen another path.
Prosecutors may be turning the screw on Carlos Romero Deschamps. But the long-time Pemex union leader has faced legal battles before.
AMLO has pledged to revive Mexico’s state oil firm, but the company’s five-year plan may do more harm than good.
With presidential elections around the corner, investor enthusiasm is no guarantee for Mexico’s new energy future.

Emilio Lozoya, the CEO of Petróleos Mexicanos (Mexican Petroleums—Pemex), announced Wednesday that some of the company’s deep water exploration projects would be put on hold due to the declining prices of crude oil.

This week's likely top stories: Haiti attempts to negotiate its way out of political deadlock; Cuba frees 53 political prisoners, holding up its end of the rapprochement deal with U.S.; Mexico cuts funding to PEMEX causing major oil sector layoffs; the U.S. Supreme court declines to review a challenge to Louisiana’s gay marriage ban; China and CELAC hammer out the details of increased economic partnership.

This week’s likely top stories: President Juan Manuel Santos announces new ministers; Venezuela and Colombia crack down on smuggling; Codelco’s CEO has new plans for Chuquicamata Mine; Bolivia deports an Argentine accused of crimes against humanity; a fire at a Pemex refinery kills at least four people.

Monday marked the conclusion of “Round Zero,” a yardstick in a process initiated as part of the Mexican energy reforms.

This month, Mexico’s Congress is debating the long-anticipated reform of Pemex, the country’s state-owned oil company.

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