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Evo Morales
Why Bolivia’s leading opposition candidate has lost momentum.
In his controversial push for a fourth term, Evo Morales faces another former president.
Ahead of next year's election, criticism surrounds Evo Morales' efforts to take advantage of a global energy trend.
Tensions are growing between Bolivia's government and civil society ahead of climate talks

Chilean Foreign Minister Heraldo Muñoz said yesterday in a press conference that the country rejected any possible mediation from the Pope in a dispute with Bolivia over sovereign access through Chile to the Pacific Ocean that dates back to the nineteenth century.

A block of six presidents—representing Brazil, Argentina, Venezuela, Bolivia, Nicaragua and Cuba—snubbed the two-day Cumbre Iberoamericana (Ibero-American Summit).

It’s been an exceptionally good year for incumbents in Latin America.

On Tuesday, Bolivian President Evo Morales—fresh from his reelection to a third term on Sunday—moved to strengthen legal measures that would help reduce domestic violence against women in the Andean country.

Bolivian President Evo Morales is expected to be elected to a third term in office on October 12—and not by a small margin.

An election poll released on Wednesday—conducted by Ipsos, a France-based global market research company—showed that Bolivian President Evo Morales is on course to be elected to a third term on October 12.

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