Brazilian elections

What do the Brooklyn hipster and the Brazilian president have in common?

This week’s likely top stories: Dilma Rousseff and Aécio Neves head to a runoff election; U.S. Supreme Court rejects same-sex marriage appeals; domestic renewable energy market opens in Chile; Mexican college students may be buried in mass graves; Peruvian elections are marred by violence; Catamarca creates a new mining district.

The unclear legacy of Chico Mendes in Brazil reflects a larger indifference toward the environment and underscores the improbable rise of his protégé, Marina Silva.

In any democracy, the choice at the ballot box often reflects which candidate is best for a voter's wallet, and many of Brazil’s 143 million voters will be directly affected by what the next president does to the price of government-regulated gasoline and oil.

While Brazilian electoral rules for political TV advertising give Rousseff a clear advantage in her bid for re-election on October 5, the latest polls show Rousseff in a statistical tie against Silva, whose political rise has drawn parallels to the 2008 candidacy of Barack Obama.

This week’s likely top stories: Marina Silva agrees to face Dilma Rousseff in Brazil’s presidential election; victims of Colombia's armed conflict speak to peace negotiators; Mexico will announce new energy projects; Julian Assange plans to leave Ecuador’s embassy “soon”; classes in Mexico are suspended due to a copper mine’s toxic spill.

Brazilian presidential candidate Eduardo Campos and six other people were killed Wednesday morning when the plane they were traveling in crashed in the coastal city of Santos in São Paulo state.

Likely top stories this week: Eduardo Campo and Marina Silva are expected to run in Brazil’s presidential elections; Chile suffers from drought and wildfires; Mexican police remove protesters; Nicaragua will start work on its canal in 2015; FIFA criticizes Brazil’s World Cup preparations.

With Brazil's October 7 election results in, mayorships in seven of Brazil’s 10 World Cup cities will now be determined during the October 28 runoff vote.


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